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CFP 'Archival Afterlives: Postwar Poetry in English', University of Manchester, 27-29 June 2017

'Archival Afterlives: Postwar Poetry in English', The John Rylands Research Institute, University of Manchester, 27-29 June 2017.

Confirmed Speakers: Lucy Collins (UCD), Stephen Enniss (University of Texas, Austin), Rachel Foss (British Library), Peter Jay (Anvil Press), Robyn Marsack (Royal Literary Fund/University of Glasgow), Deryn Rees-Jones (Pavilion Press/University of Liverpool), Michael Schmidt (Carcanet Press), David Sutton (University of Reading), Kevin Young (Emory University), 

with Poetry Readings by Elaine Feinstein and Tara Bergin.

Reflecting the strengths of the Special Collections at the John Rylands Library (University of Manchester), ‘Archival Afterlives’, the 2017 John Rylands Research Institute conference will focus on modern literary archives, and in particular on archives related to postwar poetry in English.

‘Archival Afterlives’ is intended as a forum for researchers, postgraduate students, curators, archivists, as well as poets to discuss their relationship with archival material, whether it be through creating, collecting or donating archives, or through using archival and material culture for inspiration, learning or research.

Topics for discussion will include: genetic histories of poetic texts; poetic communities and networks; poetry in translation; life writing; the publishing of poetry; the relationship of poet and editor; the materiality of poetic texts; collecting the archives of modern poetry; archives, objects with associational value and the material culture of writers and writing.

We also welcome presentations on any of the poets, translators, editors, publishers and poetic movements represented in the Library’s outstanding collection of Modern Literary Archives. These comprise the archives of poetry publishers Carcanet and Anvil, the literary journals PN Review and Critical Quarterly, as well as papers of and related to a diverse range of poets and translators. Many Irish poets are represented in the archives, and we encourage scholars of Irish poetry to submit paper proposals.

For more information about the conference, and for a detailed call for papers with submission guidelines, please visit the conference website at http://www.jrri.manchester.ac.uk/connect/events/conferences/institute-conference-2017/.

Deadline for paper and panel proposals: 15 January 2017.

Conference Steering Committee: Florence Impens (UoM), Fran Baker (UoM Library), Douglas Field (UoM), Vona Groarke (UoM), Stella Halyard (UoM Library), John McAuliffe (UoM).




 






2nd CALL FOR PAPERS: 'Archival Afterlives: Postwar Poetry in English', University of Manchester, 27-29 June 2017

EXTENDED DEADLINE: 20 FEBRUARY 2017

Confirmed Speakers: Lucy Collins (UCD), Stephen Enniss (University of Texas, Austin), Rachel Foss (British Library), Peter Jay (Anvil Press), Robyn Marsack (Royal Literary Fund/University of Glasgow), Deryn Rees-Jones (Pavilion Press/University of Liverpool), Michael Schmidt (Carcanet Press), David Sutton (University of Reading), Kevin Young (New York Public Library),

with Poetry Readings by Elaine Feinstein and Tara Bergin. 

The John Rylands Research Institute invites proposals for its 2017 conference on modern literary archives. Reflecting the strengths of the Special Collections at the John Rylands Library, the conference will focus in particular on archives related to postwar poetry in English.

‘Archival Afterlives’ will provide a forum for academic researchers, postgraduate students, curators, archivists, as well as poets to discuss their relationship with archival material, whether it be through creating, collecting or donating archives, or through using archival and material culture for inspiration, learning or research. The conference also takes place as part of a wider programme of activities at the John Rylands Research Institute and Library to facilitate the study of the holdings in modern and contemporary literature.

Topics for presentation might include:

·      Genetic histories of poetic texts; the role and place of genetic criticism in literary studies; the role and place of archival material in the study of contemporary poetry;

·      Poetic communities and networks; correspondence and its role in cementing literary networks and movements; collaborations; network mapping;

·      Poetry in translation; the process of translation; the relationship between the poet and the translator;

·      Life writing; archives and biographies;

·      The publishing of poetry; journals, publishing houses, and literary magazines;

·      The relationship of poet and editor;

·      The materiality of poetic texts; creating, documenting, managing and using literary drafts, manuscripts and proofs in physical and digital form;

·      Collecting the archives of modern poetry; ‘being archived’; the relationship of poets with their archives, and the poet with the archivist; collecting policies and strategies; the global diaspora of modern literary archives;

·      Archives and life-objects.

We also welcome presentations on any of the poets, translators, editors, publishers and poetic movements represented in the Library’s outstanding collection of Modern Literary Archives. These comprise the archives of poetry publishers Carcanet and Anvil, the literary journals PN Review and Critical Quarterly, as well as papers of and related to a diverse range of poets and translators. Poets represented in the archives include Elaine Feinstein, Grevel Lindop, Elizabeth Jennings, John Heath-Stubbs, Michael Schmidt, Brian Cox, Jeff Nuttall, John Ashbery, Eavan Boland, Gillian Clarke, Carol Ann Duffy, Louise Glück, Jorie Graham, Seamus Heaney, Ted Hughes, Paula Meehan, Edwin Morgan, Sinéad Morrissey, Les Murray, Dennis O’Driscoll, Sylvia Plath and many more.

Submissions from researchers at any stage of their career, as well as from curators and archivists are welcome. Due to significant interest, the deadline for paper and panel proposals has been extended to Monday, 20th February 2017.

Please visit the conference website for further information and guidelines on how to submit proposals.

Email address: jrri.conference2017@manchester.ac.uk

Conference Convenor: Florence Impens, Leverhulme Early Career Fellow, John Rylands Research Institute, University of Manchester.

Steering Committee: Fran Baker (University of Manchester Library), Douglas Field (University of Manchester), Vona Groarke (University of Manchester), Stella Halkyard (University of Manchester Library), John McAuliffe (University of Manchester).

Acting Out: The IV International Flann O'Brien Conference

Call For Papers
Acting Out: The IV International Flann O'Brien Conference
Salzburg University, 17-21 July 2017 


Keynote Speakers
Anne Fogarty (University College Dublin)
Stanley E. Gontarski (Florida State University)
Maebh Long (The University of the South Pacific)

Guest Writers & Performers (more to be announced...)
Arthur Riordan (Improbable Frequency, Slattery’s Sago Saga, The Train
The Liverpool-Irish Literary Theatre (The Glittering Gate, The Dead Spit of Kelly, Thirst)

The International Flann O’Brien Society is proud to announce Acting Out: The IV International Flann O’Brien Conference, an international conference on the theme of performance, theatricality, and illusion in Flann O’Brien’s writing, hosted by the Department of English Studies at Salzburg University, 17-21 July 2017.

        In recent years O’Brien’s writing has been foregrounded as an integral site for testing the rise of new modernist studies, as it troubles critical commonplaces about modernism itself by virtue of its ephemerality and parochial energies. Recent publications of out-of-print English and Irish-language columns, short stories, non-fiction, dramatic works for the stage, and teleplays for Raidió Teilifís Éireann have not only made O’Brien’s broader canon accessible to a new generation of scholars, but have also highlighted its importance to an understanding of modernism which ‘has grown more capacious, turning its attention to previously neglected forms’ (Rónán McDonald and Julian Murphet). 

  •         Germane to these critical projects is the recurring concern with performance, theatricality, and illusion in O’Brien’s prose, columns, plays, and TV scripts. In establishing his (highly ironised) aesthetic manifesto in At Swim-Two-Birds, the student narrator notes that ‘the novel was inferior to the play inasmuch as it lacked the outward accidents of illusion, frequently inducing the reader to be outwitted in a shabby fashion and caused to experience a real concern for the fortunes of illusory characters.’ If, as Richard Schechner claims, ‘performances mark identities, bend time, reshape and adorn the body, and tell stories’, then few writers better demonstrate this shaping influence and potential of the performative and the fake. 

            This dynamic of O’Brien’s work has become all the more visible with the marked rise of creative adaptations of his writing for the stage and beyond. Building on the precedent of pioneering O’Brien performers such as Jimmy O’Dea, David Kelly, and Eamon Morrissey, recent years have seen numerous creative engagements with O’Brien’s work for the stage (Blue Raincoat’s adaptations of O’Brien’s major novels, Arthur Riordan’s Improbable Frequency and Slattery’s Sago Saga, Ergo Phizmiz’s electronic-1920s-Vaudeville adaptation of The Third Policeman, Stephen Rea’s musical dramatic reading of same), film (Kurt Palm’s In Schwimmen-Zwei-Vögel, Park Films’ John Duffy’s Brother and The Martyr’s Crown) and the visual arts (John McCloskeys graphic novel of An Béal Bocht, David O’Kane’s stunning O’Brien artworks). As well as demonstrating the significant weight O’Brien’s writing continues to carry in the present cultural moment, these adaptations emphasise its sustained creative dimensions and dramatic energies.

            With these issues in mind, the conference aims to address the contours and concealments of performance in Flann O’Brien’s work as it relates to issues of identity, genre, pseudonymity, adaptation, and creative reception. Salzburg is the home of numerous internationally renowned and prestigious theatrical institutions and events, providing the perfect setting to this symposium, which will take place at the outset of the 2017 Salzburger Festspiele (Salzburg Music and Drama Festival).

    * * *

    The organisers invite proposals on any aspect of O’Nolan’s writing, but are especially interested in papers that explore questions of performance, theatricality, and illusion in O’Brien’s prose, columns, plays, and TV scripts, including, but not limited to:


    • Becoming Other: Masks, Pseudonyms, Role-Playing in O’Brien
    • (Mis)Leading Men: Gender Performativity in O’Brien
    • Props/Performing Objects: The life of objects / Object as metaphor
    • The outward accidents of illusion: Sartorial style, costumes, & uniforms in O’Brien
    • Transmedialisation: Music, Performing Arts, Visual Arts, Illustration, Animation, Film
    • Come to your Senses: Sight, Sound, Smell, Touch, Taste in O’Brien
    • Comic & Tragic Passions: O’Brien & Genre
    • Puppets and Puppet-Masters: Agency, Post-Humanism; Author vs. The Authored
    • Creativity: Improvisation vs. learning by heart
    • Culture’s Scripts: Secular and Sacred Rituals
    • Dumb play: Playing dumb
    • O’Brien and the Theatre in Irish, European, & Modernist contexts (The Abbey, The Čapeks, Pirandello, modernist anti-theatricality, William Sayoran, etc.)
    • Creative Receptions / Adaptations of O’Brien’s work


    Abstracts and Submissions

    If you would like to propose a paper (not exceeding 20 minutes), or panel (maximum 3 speakers) please submit your title and an abstract of 250 words accompanied by a short biographical sketch to flannsalzburg2017@gmail.com or paul.fagan@sbg.ac.at by 1 February 2017

     

    Given the conference’s theme, the organisers also welcome alternative forms of presentation and dialogue, such as roundtables, workshops, debate motions (and debaters), performances, creative responses to Flann O’Brien’s writing, etc.

     

    For more details as they emerge, including social programmes and accommodation & travel details, we invite you to visit


     

    Organising Committee

    Sabine Coelsch-Foisner (Salzburg University)

    Paul Fagan (Salzburg University  University of Vienna)

    Dieter Fuchs (University of Vienna)

    Ruben Borg (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

CFP: The International Flann O’Brien Society

The International Flann O’Brien Society is proud to announce Acting Out: The IV International Flann O’Brien Conference, an international conference on the theme of performance, theatricality, and illusion in Flann O’Brien’s writing, hosted by the Department of English Studies at Salzburg University17-21 July 2017. See the full CFP here

Keep up to date with conference announcements on their Facebook page, Twitter, and website.

EFACIS Conference 2017: A CORUÑA

Translocation: Pathways in Irish Studies   31st Aug - 3rd Sept 2017

First Call for Papers

Whither Irish studies? Where are we and where are we going? With scholars from every continent in universities all over the world, Irish studies is a multidisciplinary field which has expanded well beyond its initial home, geographically in Irish, British and American universities, and academically, in historical and literary studies. Irish studies flourishes in academic institutions from Beijing to Buenos Aires, from Mumbai to Moscow, and in a varied and expanding range of disciplines, including politics and sociology, musical studies, film and media studies, the visual and plastic arts, and sports studies, to name but a few. Translocation, defined as the act, process, or an instance of changing location or position, seems a fitting umbrella title to embrace the multiple themes which will be under discussion at the EFACIS Conference 2017, to be held in the beautiful Galician coastal city of A Coruña. This conference aims to be a celebration of all these different pathways in the vast field of Irish Studies and to debate the present and future of the field, with academics, experts and administrators from a variety of different academic and geographical background, while attempting to showcase the wealth and breadth of research being undertaken throughout the world.

Registration is open here.

See the full CFP and bursary options here

The 4th International Postgraduate Conference in Irish Studies 8 - 9 September 2017: Influences, Intersections, Interactions

Influences, Intersections, Interactions

The 4th International Postgraduate Conference in Irish Studies

8 - 9 September 2017

Centre for Irish Studies, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic

Website: www. http://ualk.ff.cuni.cz/centre-for-irish-studies

Contact e-mail: praguepostgraduate@gmail.com

CALL FOR PAPERS

Paper proposals are invited for an international conference which aims to bring together postgraduate projects in the area of Irish Studies. Following the success of “The Politics of Irish Writing” (2009), “Boundary Crossings” (2011) and “Tradition and Modernity” (2013),  we wish to continue offering discussion space for graduate students working in Irish literature and studies. We particularly welcome those working outside the Anglophone academic environment.

The recent rise of nationalist discourse worldwide creates a need for discussion and a re-evaluation of the concepts of influence, intersection, and interaction within, as well as  between cultures. Proposals for papers are welcome on any aspect of Irish writing, society, history or politics, with special attention to the inherent permeability of culture and society, and the role of personal, historical, literary and other influences in various areas of Irish Studies.

Participants are encouraged to address the subject in a wide range of ways, which may include:

  • Literary and artistic influences in Irish writing and the arts
  • Intersections of Irish culture with external influences
  • The role of social and literary institutions as a formative space
  • Intersections of gender, class, and ethnicity.

The conference is hosted by the Centre for Irish Studies at Charles University, Prague and takes place under the aegis of the European Federation of Associations and Centres of Irish Studies (EFACIS). The event is supported by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Ireland.

The conference is free for all participants. Basic student accommodation will be provided for international participants upon request (please notify us when sending your paper abstract). Publication options will be discussed as part of the closing session of the conference; these include a refereed collection of essays.

In order to provide more detailed feedback for each paper, the conference format will consist of 15-minute summaries followed by responses from nominated participants, who are acquainted with the full-length paper, followed by a general discussion. Participants will be asked to submit the full-length paper in advance, and may be appointed respondents to other papers. For this reason, accepted papers are expected to be in the region of 3 000 words, with a submission date of 15 June.

 

The closing session, co-presented by Dr Tom Walker (TCD) and Dr Ondřej Pilný (Charles University), will focus on research and publication opportunities, career building, and funding in Irish Studies.

 

Paper abstracts of 250 words, in either English or Irish, should be submitted to the organisers at praguepostgraduate@gmail.com by 30 January 2017. Abstracts must include the title of the paper, name and e-mail address, institutional affiliation and any AV requirements for your presentation.

Do not hesitate to contact us for any further inquiry.

Conference Committee:

Einat Adar, Galina Kiryushina, Ondřej Pilný, and Markéta Pospíšilová.

“Nótaí/Notes: Music and Ireland” Research Symposium

NUI Galway is delighted to announce the forthcoming research symposium "Nótaí/Notes: Music and Ireland," which will take place on Saturday, 23 September 2017 in Boston College’s Gasson Hall. This full-day symposium will gather together international scholars from a variety of academic disciplines, united in their interest in the topic of Music and Ireland. The symposium theme is tied to the forthcoming 2019 special issue of Éire-Ireland: an Interdisciplinary Journal of Irish Studies. Keynote speakers will include Dr Helen O’Shea (University of Melbourne) and Dr Méabh Ní Fhuartháin (National University of Ireland, Galway). Participants will also have an opportunity to acquaint themselves with Boston College’s extensive Irish Music Archives.

The symposium will be free and open to all interested parties. A full programme will be published in due course. For planning purposes, we invite you to register your interest in attending by 31 May 2017 with onsite coordinator Elizabeth Sweeney, Irish Music Librarian, John J. Burns Library, Boston College: elizabeth.sweeney@bc.edu. General enquiries should also be directed to the onsite coordinator.

Any other enquiries may be directed to symposium coordinators Dr Verena Commins and Dr Méabh Ní Fhuartháin, NUI Galway: meabh.nifhuarthain@nuigalway.ie

This event is cosponsored by Comhrá Ceoil, Centre for Irish Studies at NUI Galway, together with the Boston College Libraries and Boston College Center for Irish Programs, with additional funding provided by the Irish Research Council New Foundations scheme.

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